Adena Pin Ring Bamboo and Drapery
Berrien
                                  House Trellis
Bees and Stars Berrien House Trellis
Bixby Vine Blue Hill
                                  Stripe
Bixby Vine & Drapery Blue Hill Stripe
Coffered
                                  Rosette Fancy
                                  Ashlar
Coffered Rosette
Fancy Ashlar
Franklin Stripe King Caesar Stripe
Franklin Stripe King Caesar Stripe
Madison
                                  Damask
Laurel Harlequin Madison Damask
Net
Moses Grant Stripe Net
Pebbles
                                  and Flowerpots Philadelphia Harlequin
Pebbles and Flowerpots Philadelphia Harlequin
Plymouth Ashlar Princ- Rollins Marble
Plymouth Ashlar Prince-Rollins Marble
Ribbon
                                  Sprig
Ribbon Sprig  

 

 
Bees and
                                  Stars
Click image for larger view View alternate colorways: B  C   D  


French circa 1800-15

The Bees and Stars paper was found on an early American bandbox, although the bees and the original colors were almost indiscernible from wear, except in small protected areas under the rim of the lid. It is a fine example of a harlequin pattern, with its inverse relationship of black and white, which creates a bold geometric framework ornamented with bees and six pointed stars.

The pattern dates from the very early years of the 19th century when the geometric styles were at the height of their popularity, having originated in 1800 in France and rapidly migrated across the Atlantic.

Although there were French émigré printers in Philadelphia during this period who were producing papers of similar quality and style to those of their homeland, this pattern seems likely to have been imported, as suggested by the stars, with six rather than five points, and the use of the ornamental bees, which were a symbol of Bonaparte.

Repeat 13¾ inches
Width 21 inches
Straight Match

The historic colorway image above shows two widths of the pattern installed.  Alternate colorway images show one complete width of the pattern.